Kanban david anderson pdf

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This article is about kanban david anderson pdf process-management and improvement method. For the lean-manufacturing process, see Kanban.


Kanban is a lean method to manage and improve work across human systems. This approach aims to manage work by balancing the demands with available capacity, and improving the handling of system level bottlenecks. Work items are visualized to give participants a view of progress and process, from start to finish usually via a Kanban board. Work is pulled as capacity permits, rather than work being pushed into the process when requested.

In knowledge work and software development, this provides a visual process management system which aids decision-making about what, when and how much to produce. However Kanban can be applied to any area of work, and it can even be combined with other methods or frameworks such as Scrum. 2006-2007 project at Corbis in which the kanban method was identified.

In 2009, Don Reinertsen published a book on second-generation lean product development which describes the adoption of the kanban system and the use of data collection and an economic model for management decision-making. Another early contribution came from Corey Ladas, whose 2009 book Scrumban suggested that kanban could improve Scrum for software development. Ladas saw Scrumban as the transition from Scrum to Kanban. Mike Burrows explained kanban’s principles, practices and underlying values and related them to earlier theories and models.

Klaus Leopold and Siegfried Kaltenecker, explained the method from the perspective of change management and provided guidance to change initiatives. A condensed guide to the method was published in 2016, incorporating improvements and extensions from the early kanban projects. Kanban is an approach to process change for organizations which uses visualization with a kanban board, allowing a better understanding of work and workflow. It advises limiting work in progress, which reduces waste from multitasking and context switching, exposes operational problems and stimulates collaboration to improve the system.

Kanban is rooted in two sets of principles, for change management and service delivery, which emphasize evolutionary change and customer focus. The method does not prescribe a specific set of steps, but starts from existing context and stimulates continuous, incremental and evolutionary changes to the system. It aims to minimize resistance to change to facilitate it.

Kanban focuses on the customer and work which meets their needs, rather than individuals’ activities. Kanban has six general practices: visualization, limiting work in progress, flow management, making policies explicit, using feedback loops, and collaborative or experimental evolution. They involve seeing the work and its process and improving the process, keeping and amplifying useful changes and learning from, reversing and dampening the ineffective. Although Kanban does not require that the team or organization use a Kanban board, it is the preferred way to see the flow of work, get the participation of the team, and manage work.