Kegel exercises with pictures pdf

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Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. This article may require cleanup to meet Wikipedia’s quality standards. The specific problem is: overall construction is poor Please help improve this article if you can. Vaginal tightening is the tightening of the pelvic muscles to achieve or maintain the right degree of elasticity of the pelvic floor muscles.

These muscles must be able to contract to maintain continence, and to relax allowing for urination and bowel movements, and for sexual intercourse as well as for giving birth. They also support and protect the organs of the abdomen and hold the bladder in its proper place. The pelvic muscles can become stretched or weakened due to ageing and more specifically due to pregnancy.

This often happens after a difficult childbirth which overstretches or tears the pelvic muscles and can also be the result of giving birth to several babies within a very short time span. Their under use can also cause pelvic floor weakness.

Like for any other muscle, pelvic muscles need exercise to work well. In the same vein, the change in hormones related to menopause could weaken these muscles, as well as damage caused through long term straining, chronic constipation or cough or overweight.

Vaginal tightening can be achieved in different ways, all effective in their own way and can be complementary. The pelvic floor muscles, region of the body called the perineum, is a group of muscles and ligaments.

Its main muscle is the Pubococcygeus muscle or PC muscle. This set of muscles, also known as the muscles of the perineum, forms the floor of the pelvic cavity and supports the pelvic organs such as the bladder, uterus and colon and intestine. These muscles act like a rubber band, they need to be tense but neither too tight to avoid pelvic floor muscle disorder nor too loose, because in both cases they will lose the right degree of elasticity and therefore their main function and could potentially create a pelvic floor dysfunction. Pelvic floor dysfunctions may include any of a group of clinical conditions that includes urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, sensory and emptying abnormalities of the lower urinary tract, defecatory dysfunction, sexual dysfunction and several chronic pain syndromes, including vulvodynia.