The handbook of astronomical image processing pdf download

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XP, 32 bit and 64 bit editions. Simply double-click the downloaded file to install it. You can choose your language settings from within the the handbook of astronomical image processing pdf download. Not to be confused with Visual Snow.


Image noise is random variation of brightness or color information in images, and is usually an aspect of electronic noise. It can be produced by the sensor and circuitry of a scanner or digital camera.

Image noise can also originate in film grain and in the unavoidable shot noise of an ideal photon detector. Image noise is an undesirable by-product of image capture that obscures the desired information. By analogy, unwanted electrical fluctuations are also called “noise”. Image noise can range from almost imperceptible specks on a digital photograph taken in good light, to optical and radioastronomical images that are almost entirely noise, from which a small amount of information can be derived by sophisticated processing.

Such a noise level would be unacceptable in a photograph since it would be impossible even to determine the subject. Principal sources of Gaussian noise in digital images arise during acquisition. The sensor has inherent noise due to the level of illumination and its own temperature, and the electronic circuits connected to the sensor inject their own share of electronic circuit noise.

Amplifier noise is a major part of the “read noise” of an image sensor, that is, of the constant noise level in dark areas of the image. In color cameras where more amplification is used in the blue color channel than in the green or red channel, there can be more noise in the blue channel. At higher exposures, however, image sensor noise is dominated by shot noise, which is not Gaussian and not independent of signal intensity.